Nanostructures Give Infrared Photodetectors Three Colors to See In

The nanostructured materials known as Type-II indium arsenide/gallium antimonide/aluminum antimonide (InAs/GaSb/AlSb) superlattices have been around since the 1970s and have served in infrared detection applications since the late 1980s. Since then, Type-II Sb-based superlattice materials have evolved drastically with many variants suited for different applications.

Now researchers at Northwestern University, led by Manijeh Razeghi, have developed a new superlattice design, called M-structure superlattice. It can be used to make devices that operate as a shortwave/mid-wave/long-wave infrared photodetector. Shortwave infrared wave (SWIR) bands make it possible to detect reflected light. Mid-wave detection picks up hot plumes and long-wave infrared detects cooler objects. [Read More…]

Indium Tin Oxide Might Be the Material Photonics Has Been Waiting For

There are plenty of reasons why it’s useful to transfer information through photons or use light particles to carry out tasks within a system or device, speed chief among them. But in order to use photons with even greater dexterity in the future, researchers will need to control the way light behaves as it passes through a material.

Now a team led by Robert Boyd, a physicist at the University of Ottawa and the University of Rochester, has found that a transparent metal called indium tin oxide (ITO), which is often used in touchscreens and on airplane windows, can achieve a particularly high degree of optical nonlinearity—making it a good candidate for future photonics applications. [Read More…]

Nanotubes Serve as Light Emitter in Integrated Photonic Circuit

Using fiber optic cables as waveguides for transmitting light that is ultimately converted into voice calls or data has been a mainstay for the telecommunications industry for decades.

But it’s been a massive struggle to adapt this kind of technology to the scale of a microchip so that photons carry data through an integrated circuit instead of electrons. Now researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany have tackled a major problem in making integrated optical circuits a reality by creating nanoscale photonic emitters with tailored optical properties that can be easily integrated into a chip. [Read More…]